Accounting

Do You Have a Business Continuity Plan? You Should

Business continuity plan in a blue folderWhat if disaster strikes your business? An estimated 25% of businesses don’t reopen after a major disaster strikes.1 Having a business continuity plan can help improve your odds of recovering.

The Basic Plan

The strategy behind a business continuity (or disaster recovery) plan is straightforward: Identify the various risks that could disrupt your business, look at how each operation could be affected, and identify appropriate recovery actions.

Make sure you have a list of employees ready with phone numbers, email addresses, and emergency family contacts for communication purposes. If any of your employees can work from home, include that information in your personnel list. You’ll need a similar list of customers, suppliers, and other vendors. Social networking tools may be especially helpful for keeping in touch during and after a disaster.

Risk Protection

Having the proper insurance is key to protecting your business — at all times. In addition to property and casualty insurance, most small businesses carry disability, key-person life insurance, and business interruption insurance. And make sure your buy-sell agreement is up to date, including the life insurance policies that fund it. Meet with your financial professional for a complete review.

Maintaining Operations

If your building has to be evacuated, you’ll need an alternative site. Talk with other business owners in your vicinity about locating and equipping a facility that can be shared in case of an emergency. You may be able to limit physical damage by taking some preemptive steps (e.g., having a generator and a pump on hand).

Protecting Data

A disaster could damage or destroy your computer equipment and wipe out your data, so take precautions. Invest in surge protectors and arrange for secure storage by transmitting data to a remote server or backing up daily to storage media that can be kept off site.

Protecting Your Business

If you think your business is too small to need a plan or that it will take too long to create one, just think about how much you stand to lose by not having one. Meet with your financial professional for a full review.

Give Roe CPA, P.C. a call at 678-969-0523. We’ll set up a confidential, free initial consultation to discuss how we might make running your business a little bit easier.

Source/Disclaimer:

1Source: U.S. Small Business Administration, www.sba.gov/content/disaster-planning.

As an S Corporation Shareholder do You Need to Worry about Taxes?

Roe CPA Incorporation ServicesS corporation shareholders have an added reason to worry about their company’s annual performance: It has a direct impact on their own income taxes.

How It Works

Unlike a regular C corporation, an S corporation usually doesn’t pay federal income taxes itself. Instead, each shareholder is allocated a portion of the corporate income, loss, deductions, and credits on a special “K-1″ tax form. The shareholder then must report the items listed on the K-1 on his or her personal tax return.

The K-1 allocations are based on stock ownership percentages. So, for example, if an S corporation has $100,000 of taxable business income for the year, a person who owns 75% of the stock in the corporation would be allocated 75% of that income, or $75,000.

This scheme can get complicated. Case in point: The K-1 may show more income than the shareholder actually received from the company during the year. That’s because the K-1 figure is based on the corporation’s actual taxable income — not on the distributions made to the shareholder.

Here’s an example: Tom starts a new corporation, electing S status. In the first year, Tom draws a $30,000 salary and receives no other distributions from the company. The company’s ordinary business income (after deducting his salary) is $10,000. Since Tom is the only shareholder, all the company’s $10,000 of income is allocated to him on his K-1. Tom must include both the $30,000 of salary and the $10,000 on his personal income tax return, even though all he actually received from the corporation was his salary.

This result seems harsh, but it’s not the end of the story. Special rules in the tax law prevent the same income from being taxed again. Essentially, Tom will be credited with already having paid taxes on the $10,000 so that any future distribution of the funds will not be taxable.

Tracking Basis

To determine whether non-dividend distributions are tax free, S corporation shareholders must keep track of their stock basis.1 The computation generally starts with a shareholder’s initial capital contribution (or the stock’s cost if it was purchased) and changes from year to year as the shareholder is allocated corporate income, loss, etc. Non-dividend distributions that don’t exceed a shareholder’s stock basis are tax free.

Note that starting in 2018, S corporation shareholders may be eligible to deduct up to 20% of their S corporation pass-through income.  Eligibility depends on taxable income and other factors. S shareholders will want to consult their tax advisor to see if they can take advantage of the deduction to lower the taxes on their business income.

We offer a free, confidential consultation for new clients, so call 404-504-7051 today to learn more about our new business advisor and incorporation services.

Source/Disclaimer:

1Most distributions made from an S corporation are non-dividend distributions. Dividend distributions can occur if the company was previously a regular C corporation (or in other limited situations).

Making a Year’s Profit in a Seasonal Business

ThinkstockPhotos-519122648Running a business takes an enormous amount of time and energy. It’s not easy keeping up with all the details, so many business owners seek help from Roe CPA, P.C., an Atlanta CPA firm with extensive experience in all facets of small business accounting.

If you have a seasonal business, you most likely face some challenges that year-round businesses don’t. After all, trying to squeeze a year’s worth of business into a far shorter period can get pretty hectic. Here are some tips that may help.

Cash Control

All small business owners have to be careful cash managers. Strict management is particularly critical when cash flows in over a relatively short period of time. One very important lesson to learn: Control the temptation to overspend when cash is plentiful.

Arming yourself with a realistic budget and sound financial projections — including next season’s start-up costs — will help you maintain control. And you may want to establish a line of credit just in case.

In the Off-season

It’s difficult to maintain visibility when you aren’t in business year round. But there’s no reason why you can’t send your customers periodic updates via e-mail or snail mail. You’ll certainly want to announce your reopening date well ahead of time. You can also spend time developing new leads and lining up new business.

Time for R and R

You deserve it, so take some time for rest and relaxation. But you’ll also want to use the time you’re closed to make any necessary repairs and take care of any sprucing up you’d like to do. You can also use the off-season to shop around and look for deals on items you keep in stock and/or equipment you need to buy or replace.

Expansion Plans

If you’re thinking of making the transition from “closed for the season” to “open all year,” start investigating new product lines or services. If you diversify in ways that are complementary to and compatible with your core business, your current customer base may provide support right away. A well-thought-out expansion can be the key to a successful transition into a year-round business.

Being the owner of any type of business has its rewards — and its challenges. We have a lot of experience working with small business owners and would be happy to assist you in any way we can.

To learn more tips about how to increase the bottom line of your seasonal business, give us a call today at 404-504-7051. Our staff of trained and experienced professionals will be happy to answer all of your questions. Or, request a free consultation online.

IRS Going After Golf Courses for Tax Deduction

Golf Course Easement3It’s getting much tougher to successfully claim a charitable deduction for a conservation easement.  Unfortunately, this will further erode the construction of new golf course projects in 2016 and beyond.

Typically, a new golf course project will make consideration plans to conserve and protect the natural habitat of fish, wildlife, and natural ecosystem by preserving open space for the scenic enjoyment of the general public.   These easements often amount to sizeable charitable deductions which help offset the investment.

Although the IRS has lost several conservation easement cases regarding golf courses, they turned the tide in 2003 and 2005 and have become more aggressive fighting these situations.  In 2003 and 2005, the IRS went to Tax Court over two North Carolina golf course easements.  In both instances, the IRS disagreed with the taxpayers over charitable deductions.   The court, the IRS stated that “fairways, tee boxes and greens … are sodded or planted with 419 Bermuda and Tidwarf, which are Golf Course Easement2nonnative grasses and consequently do not provide a relatively natural habitat for the pitcher plants and Venus flytraps.”  Additionally, the court found that the use of pesticides, insecticides, fungicides, herbicides and fertilizers not only does not preserve the natural habitat, but actually “injures or destroys” the habitat. And, being part of a gated community that is not open to the general public does not provide scenic enjoyment for the general public.  In both cases, the IRS won.

In 2009, a coastal Alabama golf course project, Kiva Dunes, won a three year court battle which vindicated their $28.7M tax break in exchange for leaving 141 acres of land undeveloped.  This setback created a round of legislative changes aimed at banning golf course easements altogether.  Fortunately, this effort was blunted by the golf industry.

Since the beginning of 2014, there have been 19 cases heard in US Tax or federal district court regarding conservation easements for golf courses.

If you are seeking to minimize your tax obligations legally, call 404-504-7051 and ask for John Charles Roe.

 

Roe CPA is a Georgia licensed CPA Firm with two convenient office locations, Atlanta and Norcross.  We work with all types of businesses and also have specialty services in golf course accounting, restaurant accounting, and real estate accounting.

Business Start-up Costs — What’s Deductible?

Start Up2Launching a new business takes hard work — and money. Costs for market surveys, travel to line up potential distributors and suppliers, advertising, hiring employees, training, and other expenses incurred before a business is officially launched can add up to a substantial amount.

The tax law places certain limitations on tax deductions for start-up expenses.

  • No deduction is available until the business becomes active.
  • Up to $5,000 of accumulated start-up expenses may be deducted in the tax year in which the active business begins. This $5,000 limit is reduced (but not below zero) by the excess of total start-up costs over $50,000.
  • Any remaining start-up expenses may be deducted ratably over the 180-month period beginning with the month in which the active business begins.

Example. Gina spent $20,000 on start-up costs before her new business began on July 1, 2015. In 2015, she may deduct $5,000 and the portion of the remaining $15,000 allocable to July through December of 2015 ($15,000/180 × 6 = $500), a total of $5,500. The remaining $14,500 may be deducted ratably over the remaining 174 months.

Instead of deducting start-up costs, a business may elect to capitalize them (treat them as an asset on the balance sheet). Deductions for “organization expenses” — such as legal and accounting fees for services related to forming a corporation or partnership — are subject to similar rules.

If you would like to minimize your taxes legally, call 404-504-7051 and ask for John Charles Roe.

 

Roe CPA is an Atlanta CPA Accounting firm with two convenient office locations, Buckhead and Norcross.  We service self employed business owners of all types.  For additional complexity, we have specialty services in restaurant accounting, hotel accounting, real estate accounting and entertainment accounting.

Cam Newton Loses Super Bowl Check

Cam NewtonBy now, we all know how frustrating Cam Newton was by losing the Super Bowl.  To make matters worse, he actually lost money since the Super Bowl was held in California and he is subject to “jock taxes.”  Technically, he has to pay the state of California more than his Super Bowl check.  Learn the details.

 

Office Space Decisions – Atlanta Biz Owners

Buy or lease?

Office SpaceIt’s a decision many small businesses face. Owning real estate certainly can have advantages, including the opportunity to build equity. But many small businesses in need of space choose the rental route instead.

Cash Flow Considerations

By leasing, a company can avoid taking on debt to acquire a property. Less debt on the balance sheet may allow the company to finance other things, such as receivables or inventory and equipment purchases. And the upfront cash commitment needed to enter a lease agreement may be much lower than the down payment required for a property purchase.

Shopping Tips

If your business is looking around for the right rental location, here are a few suggestions to keep in mind. Not all of these tips are appropriate for all businesses, but some may help you get a lead on a good spot — and a good deal.

  • Find an eager landlord. Rental spots that have been on the market for a while could have some negative features, but they may be worth a look. If you find a location that suits you, you might also find a landlord who is anxious to negotiate.
  • Think about the term. A long-term lease locks in your rental rate — and that can be an advantage if you expect the market to trend upward. But leasing for short periods is often less expensive than leasing for longer periods. If your business is in its formative years, significant changes may lie ahead, so a short-term arrangement could be more practical, too. Adding an “option to renew” clause can help keep your costs down and your options open.
  • Divide and conquer. Could you make do with two smaller spaces instead of one large space? The more flexible you can be, the better your chances of finding a good deal.
  • Check rental comps. Commercial property markets can be very localized. Rents may vary considerably between one locality and another just a few miles away. Unless you’re limited to a specific location, compare rates in several areas.

If you are tired of overpaying taxes, call 404-504-7051 and ask for John Charles Roe.

 

Roe CPA is a tax accountant with two convenient office locations, Lenox Square and Norcross.  We service self employed business owners of all types.  For additional complexity, we have specialty services in restaurant accounting, hotel accounting, real estate accounting and entertainment accounting.

3 Tasks Atlanta Entrepreneurs are Better Outsourcing

OutsourceAs a business owner, it can be difficult to delegate important tasks. When you complete them yourself, you know they will be done correctly and in a timely manner. Even so, if you want your business to grow, and keep expenses low, there are three tasks that you should consider outsourcing.

Website and Graphic Design

By outsourcing your website and graphic design, you will have access to an expert in the field, on demand. The person or company you outsource to will have the equipment, experience, training and knowledge to provide you with design concepts that would otherwise be beyond your reach.

You will also receive a professional product which is doubly important as your website is your online business card. This is one area that you want and need a professional’s assistance.

Payroll

As your company grows, the complexities of your payroll grow as well. In addition to saving time and money, payroll is one area of your business that the government takes great interest in. Payroll specialists make it their job to stay current in government regulations which means they will keep you and your company compliant.

In addition, payroll companies can provide you and your employees with an added layer of security. This can reduce the risk of embezzlement, identity theft, and interference, by an employee, with company records for financial gain.

Accounting and Tax Returns

Much like payroll, your accounting and tax returns are not an area of your business where you can afford errors. Without specialized tax knowledge, you run the risk of missing deductions leading to paying higher taxes than necessary or to making errors that result in penalties.

One of the main benefits of outsourcing any task is that while you may pay more per hour for the task to be completed, you will save much more money, in the long run, than if you hired a full-time employee when you take into consideration salary, benefits, taxes, health insurance, as well as the overhead to provide space for the employee to work. In the end, outsourcing can be a cost efficient way to expand your business.

If you’d like to learn more about outsourced accounting and outsourced payroll, call 404-504-7051 and ask for John Charles Roe.  Our initial consultation is free.

 

Roe CPA is a Georgia licensed certified public accounting firm with offices in Buckhead and Norcross.  We service all types of businesses.  For additional expertise, we have specialties in restaurant accounting, hotel accounting and real estate accounting.

 

Tax Treatment for Bitcoin Payments

BitcoinIf you’ve paid attention to the news the last few years, you will have heard of Bitcoins. In fact, you may even have considered accepting them as payment for services or product sales. Before you do, you’ll want to make sure you have an understanding of how the IRS treats Bitcoin payments.

First, it’s important to be aware of the fact that the IRS does not consider Bitcoins, which are virtual currency, as a legitimate state-backed currency. Instead, they see Bitcoins as property.

This means that the tax rules that apply to property transactions will also apply to payments received in Bitcoins. When a person, or business acquires property, they are required to record the fair market value of the property. This will become the owner’s basis for the property.

Once the property is sold or exchanged, if the fair market value of the property has increased, then the owner will have a taxable gain. On the other hand, if it has decreased in value, the owner will have a loss.

This means that if a business owner sells a product today and receives Bitcoins worth $100 but then converts them to dollars next week and the value has increased to $120, they will have a gain of $20 that will be taxed as capital gains.

This becomes even more complicated when multiple Bitcoin transactions take place. Each transaction needs to be tracked separately and each will have its own gain or loss depending on the current valuation of Bitcoins when they are converted to dollars.  The amount of paperwork and record-keeping becomes significant.

There are a couple of workarounds for this. First, each transaction can be converted to dollars immediately. Secondly, there are now Bitcoin merchant service providers that will deal with all of the backend record-keeping that is necessary. This allows businesses to accept Bitcoins without ever actually dealing with them.

The IRS ruling treating Bitcoins as property turned the Bitcoin world and those who want to accept them on their heads, but technology and even the IRS will eventually catch up to the new reality of virtual currencies, but it may take awhile.

If you are tired of overpaying taxes, call 404-504-7051 and ask for John Charles Roe.

 

Craft Brewery Sells for $1 Billion

Ballast PointWhen a craft brewery that most of us have never heard of sells for $1 billion dollars, then you realize that it’s no longer a tiny niche business.

Craft beer accounted for 11% of U.S. beer sales in 2014 and market share is rapidly increasing. Just this week, the owner of Corona and Modelo, Constellation Brands, purchased Ballast Point for roughly $1 billion.

Ballast Point started selling beer commercially in 1996 and growing at a rate of 80% over the past two years. According to Brewer’s Assn, it is the 31st largest craft brewer in the country. Ballast Point is available for sale in 30 states and Sculpin IPA is their hot seller. Overall, Ballast Point produces approximately 300,000 barrels annually and the sale does not include Ballast Point Spirits, which makes rums and whiskeys.

Ballast SculpinTo put this into perspective, Constellation Brands will be paying 20 times Ballast’s revenue in 2014. And if Ballast’s revenue increases 100% in 2015, then the multiple is 10 times revenue, which is still a stiff premium.

And while demand for craft brews explodes, demand for watered down national brands like Bud, Miller, and Coors is flat which is creating a trend towards consolidation. For example, AB InBev’s takeover of SABMiller for $107B.

While the acquisition of craft brews is nothing new, the valuation on this purchase is eye opening.

Roe CPA is an Atlanta CPA Firm servicing all types of business owners that would like to sell their business for $1B or more.  If you are searching for an accountant to help you with the next phase of growth, call 404-504-7051 and ask for John Charles Roe.  Our initial consultation is free.

For additional expertise, Roe CPA Firm has a concentration amongst restaurant owners, brew pubs and lodging businesses.